How to Improve Teaching in the Modern Era

Abstract

In the modern era, where quality MOOCs are developed in reputational academic institutes and the knowledge become open access and available to all, there is still a need for quality teaching. However, in order to be meaningful teachers, we need to reconsider the way the role of our teaching and the way we teach. In this course, I will guide how to re-define the goals of your course, and accordingly adapt your course and assessment to these goals. We will be inspired by examples that are taken from different areas (e.g., sports) and find the connections between, course goals, course contents, teaching and interacting with our students and course assessment in order to improve our teaching

Glossary

  • Re-thinking about the role of a lecturer
  • To teach like a coach
  • Why video lessons cannot replace the lecturer?
  • From teaching content – to learning goals
  • Connecting assessment to learning goals

Learning Outcomes

By taking the course and actively participating in the course assignments the students will be able to:
• Define the learning outcome of their course (the course that they teach)
• Be familiar with the different model of teaching and know their goals
• Be able to conduct group working during a lecture session
• Design a new structure for your course
• Build assessment that will evaluate students achieving the course learning outcomes

Responsible Lecturer

Prof. Ron Blonder (WIS)

Bibliography

  1. Childress, H. (1998). Seventeen reasons why football is better than high school Phi Delta Kappan; Bloomington, 79(8), 616-619
  2. ECTS Users’ Guide (2005) Brussels: Directorate-General for Education and Culture. Available online at: http://ec.europa.eu/education/programmes/socrates/ ects/doc/guide_en.pdf
  3.  Jenkins, A., & Unwin, D. (2001). How to write learning outcomes. Retrieved from https://www.ubalt.edu/cas/faculty/faculty-matters/How%20to%20write%20student%20learning%20outcomes.pdf
  4. Nasir, N. I. S., & Hand, V. (2008). From the court to the classroom: Opportunities for engagement, learning, and identity in basketball and classroom mathematics. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 17(2), 143-179
  5. Young, M. R., Klemz, B. R., & Murphy, J. W. (2003). Enhancing learning outcomes: The effects of instructional technology, learning styles, instructional methods, and student behavior. Journal of Marketing Education, 25, 130-142. doi:10.1177/0273475303254004

External Evaluator 

Dr. Rachel Mamlok-Naaman (Weizmann Institute of Science)